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The Reason Why You Aren’t Getting Stronger or Progressing Towards Your Goals

The Reason Why You Aren’t Getting Stronger or Progressing Towards Your Goals

We’ve all been there. There was a time in our training where the progress just seemed to stop. It became the un-bustable plateau. Maybe it’s getting stuck at a 225 pound bench press for 10 reps. Maybe it’s getting stuck at 150 pounds. Somewhere along the line that “beginner magic”, where the results came almost easy, just wore off. Now it’s been two years and you’ve gone to the gym consistently busting your ass but you haven’t made any noticeable progress from where you were. Why? How can all this work count for nothing? We’ll, I’m going to tell you.

 

Let’s keep it really simple.. I’ll start with a question. How do we progress? We make small progressions over time, right? We can’t expect to PR every workout over the lifetime of our fitness careers, but we can put a plan in place that lets us PR every time we plan to test our maxes. But what do we consider small progressions over time? If you’ve been stuck at 225 pounds for 10 reps on the bench press and you’re waiting to feel like you’ve progressed enough to add more weight, when is it time to do so? Well the problem that most of us have is that we spend more time waiting than necessary. Maybe it’s waiting for a day we have a workout partner who pumps us up and we add an extra 10 or 15 pounds. But how often does that happen?

 

The truth is that we all progress differently. But in order to adapt, we need to progress. So our plan of action needs to ensure that it does happen. Some people (especially if you’re new to working out) seem to progress every single week. They might add 5 pounds per week to their 8 rep max. Every single week they can do the same workouts and they just keep throwing weight on the bar. That’s progression.

 

But what if you can’t do that? We don’t want to go to failure every single set, and we certainly don’t want to sacrifice form to get more reps up because we had to add weight. So how do you progress from there? Maybe you couldn’t add 5 or 10 pounds this week, but could you do an extra set? Could you bump up your 3 sets of flat bench to 4 sets? Again, this depends. If you’ve been recovering well recently, you can probably add a set. That’s progression.

 

If you feel like you’ve been beaten to a pulp and there’s no way you can add a single set to your workout, you’ve got a couple things to consider. 1- When was the last time you de-loaded? Your cumulative fatigue may be at a point where you are best suited to take a de-load week to reduce it. And 2- Is your workout routine designed optimally?

 

There is a magical line that we should all recognize in the pursuit of our goals. It’s the line that tells us we’re working too hard or not hard enough. We want to work right up that that line to optimize our results as efficiently as possible. Going over that line is called overreaching, which is ok as long as it’s planned and usually followed up with a de-load. Staying well under that line means we are just spinning our tires and not doing enough work to progress and force adaptations within our body. Does this line have a name? Yep.. It’s your Maximum Recoverable Volume (MRV). And unfortunately, this line is not universal. It depends on a long list of factors (like training experience) and is different for everybody. But it’s name is pretty self-explanatory. It’s the most amount of work that we can do that allows us to recover and not interfere with our next workout.

 

It’s not that hard to figure out your own MRV. It just takes some time to test it. Let’s say you use 100 pound dumbbells for 3 sets of 10 on flat bench. Next week do 4 sets. Then try 5 the following week. If during that week, your reps looked like this: 10, 10, 10, 10, 7- your MRV for that exercise at that weight was the 4th set. You failed on the 5th, so that was a little bit past your MRV.

 

Do we want to train to our MRV every workout? We suggest working up to your MRV over the course of three weeks, then overreaching on your fourth week, and then you would follow that up with a de-load on your fifth week. (FYI: when I say de-load, that doesn’t mean a week off. It’s a week at a calculated lesser volume). Then you could start the cycle over.

 

So that should help us in deciding how to maximize the efficiency of our workouts, but how do we parlay that back into progressions? Well, that will help us calculate what the overview of our program should look like. But in the day to day of each of our individual workouts, ON AVERAGE, each workout should have increased volume from the last. That doesn’t mean every single workout, but on average that should be the rule… Increased volume=progression.

 

This part can get pretty technical when it comes to designing your program. But for those of you who aren’t sure exactly what volume is: weight x sets x reps = volume. If you bench 100 pounds for 4 sets of 10, your volume is 4000 lbs. So whether you add 5 pounds next week, or increase that same load for an additional set, your volume is increased. The extra set increases volume a lot more than the 5 pound increase at the same number of sets. So both should be incorporated at different times in the program to ensure you are progressing, but not overreaching too often.

 

Everyone has heard the phrase, “Train insane or remain the same,” right? There’s a little more to it than that, but it’s true. If you train the same, you remain the same. You need an overload to progress. You need to progress to force adaptations. We need adaptations to go to the beach every summer or to leave a competition with something shiny. You have to train harder AND smarter.. We can help with that! Join the Evolution and find the success that so many of our members have already!

 

http://www.sd-evolution.com/services.html

Do You Really Know Why You Workout? Probably Not…

Do You Really Know Why You Workout? Probably Not…

I workout because

I wanted to do a different type of blog today. I still wanted it to be fitness oriented but from a different perspective. I didn’t want to do this one on a new trend or on tips to grow your arms or shrink your waste. I wanted to go deep. So I started with myself. What would I want to know? What haven’t I really heard or learned about in a while? What topic would really benefit our clients the most? Then it hit me…

Why the hell are we doing what we’re doing?? This may seem like a pretty dumb question. But here are the top answers to the question, why do you workout?

  1. I want to be healthier.
  2. I want more energy throughout the day.
  3. I want to look good naked!

Do these sound familiar? Another common one would be, because my doctor said I should. But for the purpose of this article, I want to focus on personal reasons, not outside sources.

So let’s dive in… You want to be healthier- Ok, why? Are you sick? Overweight? Do you have a genetic predisposition to something happening down the road? You want more energy throughout the day- Go to bed earlier. I can probably guarantee you don’t get 8 hours of sleep every night. If you think I’m wrong, write everything down for 7 days in a row. What do you end up at? 42 hours maybe? You want to look good naked- Well I have no response to that one. Ask your mirror, or your significant other (go easy on them if you don’t like the answer).

Where did those answers get us? Not very far right… Those answers were all pretty shallow, as were the top three responses to the original question, why do you workout? To truly dedicate yourself to a program, you have to truly know what you are working out for. How do we do that? I’m going to show you! It’s called “Root-Cause Analysis”. This is actually one of the cooler things I learned about when I entered the fitness industry. Unless you’ve done this before, or are a fitness competitor of some sort, you honestly probably don’t know why you’re working out. You might think you do, but it’s much broader than the actual reason. It isn’t hard to get lost. I sometimes find myself spinning in circles trying to hit 15 different goals at the same time. So this was fun for me to go through and refocus! The concept of root-cause analysis is very simple: keep asking “why” until you get to the real reason (root cause). This isn’t even limited to fitness, you can apply it to anything you are struggling to understand about yourself in your life.. Your psychiatrist was on to something…

So here we go! It might sound a little weird having a conversation with myself, but bare with me. You’ll get the jist of it.

 

Josh: Why do you workout?

Josh: So I can get stronger.

Josh: Why?

Josh: So I can use that strength to add more size.

Why do you want more size?

So I can look more filled out on my large frame. I’m 6’2 so I need more mass to show muscularity.

Why do you want more muscularity?

Because I feel like I’m smaller than most fitness athletes my height.

Why do you care if you’re smaller than most fitness athletes your height?

Because I want to be the best at what I do, and my body is my trademark. If other athletes have a better physique than I do, they will seem more credible than I am. A picture is worth a thousand words and, in the fitness industry especially, a lot of times a picture is your best marketing tool. I want people to see me as an inspiration. I want to be viewed as a goal for someone else to strive for. I don’t want to bust my ass day in and day out to be viewed as an average joe who goes to the gym after work just because it’s something to do before bed. I want to be the best and I want to look the best. I want the physique of a greek god. Large, lean, and proportionate. That’s what I want.

 

And that, my friends, is Root-Cause Analysis. We’re all going to come up with different answers, and that’s the point. Your answer might be, “I workout so I can keep up with my kids.” I’ll be honest, I didn’t know how this was going to turn out as I wrote it. I literally asked myself these questions as I typed this article. Notice how my answers get a little longer after each “why”. It forces you to think. More thinking creates more elaboration. More elaboration requires you to dig deeper and ultimately reveals WHAT YOU WANT. This shit is therapeutic. Excuse my language but that felt good. There’s nothing more frustrating that not knowing what you want. I’ve been in this rut for a little while. I couldn’t choose between training for strength or size or athleticism or a blend of everything-which would limit my growth in all of them as a compromise to get better at all of them at the same time. When we do this to ourselves, we ultimately find ourselves in a rut because we are spread too thin trying to do too much.

Throughout this little experiment I went a little bit deeper, off the record. It got me thinking about competing again. I’ve been competitive my whole life. I always had something to train for- basketball, baseball, football, track, even MMA for a little while. So I didn’t have to think about it. That’s why I trained. So because of my root-cause analysis, I discovered I might want to do a physique competition. How else am I supposed to judge if I have the best physique? So there we go. That’s why I train. That’s why I workout. Will I enter a competition? Maybe.. But I now have a focused view of what I want to train for, and when I’m ready, I’ll make that decision.

As we get older, most of us are no longer competing in any athletic leagues. Life takes over. We work. We get married. We have kids. But be a little selfish and do something for you.

Continuing on the therapeutic trend this has put me on, I went one more level and asked myself why this has become so important to me, a perfect physique. The answer to that one? I’m inspired each and every day by this amazing girl I get to call mine. My girlfriend, my best friend, my partner in crime. She inspires me because she inspires literally thousands of people every single day. The girl is 122 pounds and is breaking records for lifting more weight than the kids I used to play football with. Her physique is also phenomenal. And her heart is second to none. The passion she shows with our clients overshadows everything she has done on a personal level. She has changed so many lives (and bodies) and is a role model to an incredible female base. They look up to her as a role model and reach out to her on a daily basis for help and advice. She is my inspiration to get to an elite level. And I won’t stop grinding because she’ll be right there with me. I’m a lucky guy to be on this team.

So why do you train?

 

Until next time,

Josh

What you need to know about rest day

What you need to know about rest day

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We’ve all seen the funny pictures on Instagram. Rest day… Who needs it? This is becoming a more widely asked, and speculated, question around the fitness community. Routines are being taken to new extremes each day. And this is good, because it means we are pushing our limits to new heights. You can’t discover how far your body can actually go until you push past every threshold. And here comes the but… BUT there are limitations on how long you can push your body that hard.

People have started questioning whether there was any truth to the concept of “overtraining”. That is where these pictures, articles, and discussions gained momentum. A main argument was that if you feel good and you aren’t sore, your recovery time has reduced and you can now workout more frequently on less rest (if any). But there are some other factors being overlooked that don’t have to do with how your muscles are feeling today. Your body is a very, very complicated thing. So I’ll get into what those other factors are in a second but first I want to ask you if you’ve felt any of these lately, or if you remember having any of these after a week where you tried pushing yourself to a new extreme..

Your outsides:

Persistent muscle soreness (not your regular “that was one hell of a workout” soreness but the kind that lasts longer than it was supposed to), elevated resting heart rate, past injuries begin hurting again or you are recognizing new pain, not getting as good of a pump or not feeling as refreshed after a workout (you don’t get that “ahh” moment when you’re done), weight loss, stuck in a plateau (working hard but haven’t made any progress)

Your insides:

Irritability, depression, loss of appetite, loss of motivation, fatigue throughout the day, not mentally sharp- can’t focus and can’t concentrate well, insomnia (this is a big one.. trouble falling asleep and staying asleep.. very restless), lack of interest, getting sick (cold/flu)

These are all signs that you aren’t getting enough rest AKA overtraining! But your body was feeling so good and you thought that removing that rest day was the only way to capitalize on it. Well your body was feeling good because you had a great balance of exercise and rest. Now it’s all exercise and there is no balance.  Your body is constantly being broken down when you workout, but without rest, it doesn’t get to rebuild itself. So let’s breakdown this process. Here is the point of working out in a nutshell. Workout- breakdown body. Rest- recovery and growth. Workout- breakdown body. Rest- recovery and growth. RESULT- a stronger, healthier body. Now here is overtraining in a nutshell. Workout- breakdown body. Workout- breakdown body. Workout- breakdown body. Do you get the picture? There is no rebuild. You are breaking down what is still broken down and actually making yourself WEAKER! Now if that counter-productivity isn’t frustrating, I don’t know what is.

Earlier I mentioned that there was more to this concept that your muscles and your body feeling good. Working out places a HUGE stress on your central nervous system, or CNS. The CNS is responsible for controlling muscular contractions. When this becomes fatigued, it creates a reduction in the output of the motor control regions in the brain. This, in essence, causes a decrease in performance. Every time you move, your brain has nerve impulses generated by chemical activity. After intense training, that neural drive is reduced. So even if your muscles feel great, that workout also took a toll on your CNS.

So all of those “outside” effects may have made sense to you as general side effects of working out, but those “inside” effects may have seemed a little outside the box. Well that’s all tied into everything else that overtraining affects that often gets overlooked. Even something like getting sick seems silly, but when you place that added stress on your body with no recovery, everything starts to breakdown and your immune system gets much weaker, because yet again, YOUR BODY CANT RECOVER WHEN YOU ARE CONSTANTLY BREAKING IT DOWN.

I won’t pretend I’ve never pushed my boundaries and tried to go without rest days. I did. I love pushing my body to new levels. It’s an addiction. I want to see how far I can go in everything I do. And in our minds, taking a day off seems like a wasted day. But we have to remind ourselves, rest is just as important as the workout because the workout is where we break ourselves down, and the rest day is where our bodies recover and get STRONGER. Yep, that lazy day you take every week… That’s the day you are getting better at everything you worked so hard at. That doesn’t mean lay in bed 6 days a week… Balance…

Push your body to it’s limit and find YOUR perfect balance. For myself, and many others, a 3 days on 1 day off schedule is extremely effective. You are still working out 6 days a week, but never more than 3 days in a row. For others, a 2 on 1 off 2 on 2 off schedule works better. As with everything else, we are all created differently with different needs. Play around with it. If you feel great, it’s working.

Until next time,

~Josh

There are Miracles Created by Power-Lifting! But Weight Loss?

There are Miracles Created by Power-Lifting! But Weight Loss?

heavy barbell

When we think of power-lifting, we often think of giant men lifting enormous amounts of weight. So naturally, we correlate heavy weights with big muscles. This is where the “I don’t lift weights because I don’t want to get big” myth came into place… We’ve already touched on this topic plenty and we will save more of these arguments for another day. But today’s topic is power-lifting for weight loss.

To put it simply, the more weight you move, the more calories you burn. Why? Because it requires more work to move more weight. Calories are our bodies’ energy source and those are what we burn to get our bodies to work. You can do dumbbell bench presses with 5 pounders all day, but the results will be limited if you are even lucky enough to see any. Same thing with body-weight squats. They can only get you so far. But load up that bar with 100, 200, even 300 pounds and see what your body can do! This is where the magic happens!

On top of that, a well-designed power-lifting program should be well-rounded. You are hitting your entire body in many fewer exercises, and getting better results from it. Nothing beats a quality, compound movement. Isolation movements have their place, but that place isn’t in an efficient weight-loss program. The truth is that if you have a lot of weight to lose, cable triceps press downs do not belong in your routine. Ab machine crunches don’t either. You should get most of your core work from your basic lifts. I’m not saying you should never do a plank or any core-specific work, but isolation movements (like the machine crunch) should be saved for your fine-tuning phase when you are much closer to your goal.

Let me explain the difference between a compound movement compared to an isolation movement. This should show you why it is so much more effective to incorporate compound movements. For legs: Compound movement-Barbell Squat vs. Isolation movement- Leg Extension. The leg extension is an exercise that is focusing specifically on the quads (the top side of your leg). This movement is performed in complete isolation, meaning no other muscles are required to do any work. The barbell squat is a compound movement that not only incorporates many more muscles in your legs, it actually includes about 75% of the muscles in your body to do some sort of work. Some of the muscles are the prime movers (glutes), others are assisting muscles, and many are stabilizing muscles that engage your core and keep proper movement patterns in tact. Now why would you choose the exercise that only uses one muscle? You would have to do a lot more exercises to engage all the muscles that you would in the squat. So why would you choose the isolation exercise? For one reason and one reason only- because it’s easier! Challenge yourself with the heavier, compound movements and your body will thank you!

To give you an idea of some quality, basic compound lifts, here is what I’m talking about:

Squats, Deadlifts, Bench Press, Bent-Over Row, and Military Press are a great place to start. These are your power-lifting movements at your most basic form. There are plenty of alterations to that, of course. One of my favorites is a clean to press, or for beginners- a regression to (squat to reverse curl to press). This is building strength, requires a lot of work, and is a very efficient total-body movement that will burn a lot of calories.

The biggest component in this program being utilized for weight loss is your nutrition. If you are following the right meal plan and properly designed power-lifting program, you can get absolutely shredded! This stuff works so don’t be afraid to step out of what you think you know, and try something new. Start the new year off right and take some chances! If you train the same, you will remain the same. Nothing is more frustrating than busting your butt and not seeing a difference. So get to it! Check out our site at www.sd-evolution.com or our instagram @sd_evolution for some amazing transformations, and transformations in the process! If you are interested in personal training or your own personalized workout program and meal plan, those are on the site as well! Good luck guys!

 

Until next time,

Josh

 

Everything you need to know to successfully start your Post-Holiday workout reboot!

Everything you need to know to successfully start your Post-Holiday workout reboot!

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It happens to all of us. Ok, if you really want to argue, it happens to 99% of us. The holiday season begins and things get crazy. Our workouts get rescheduled (or maybe one or two are even missed) and our diets become a little more lax… We’re running around getting presents and getting ready for parties and seeing family, and fitness takes a back seat for longer than we planned. We get a little softer. We start watching our results disappear day by day. But there is a light at the end of that tunnel! If you can sneak through that process relatively unscathed, you’re already in good shape. So here we are. We have officially made it past Christmas and we are all staring in the mirror. Now what? Now we get started…

The first thing you need to do is put your workout plan back in focus. Plan out your entire week of workouts and meals. DO NOT WING IT. You will have a very frustrating time getting back into a rhythm if you walk into the gym and plan your workout on the fly. You will walk right back out feeling like you accomplished little to nothing and that is not a positive note to start your system reboot on. Go in with a force. Throw your headphones on and get the job done. You are not there to socialize. You are not there to talk about what you got for Christmas. You are there to get your body back.

You must start by choosing what type of program you are going with. Are you continuing a weight-loss/cutting phase? Are you looking to put some more muscle on? Or do you want to continue a strength training routine? Chances are, regardless of what you are getting back into, you are going to be set back a little bit from where you left off. That’s ok, just record it and use that as a starting point. This is Day 1! Next, you get into the nitty gritty. Sit down and plan each day of your workouts for the entire week and STICK TO IT. If you don’t feel qualified to do so, get some help. The trainer at your gym probably won’t write you a program without you signing up for a personal training package. But if that isn’t in the budget, you have plenty of online options. Here at SD Evolution, we run a New Year’s Special on a very affordable 8 week program, and always offer our regular 12-week Online Trainer and Meal Plan.

Next, get your meals back in check. Meal prep, meal prep, meal prep. I’m sure you have plenty of left overs from the holiday parties… Give them away! Get back to what you know works. Go shopping for the healthy goodies and spend a day preparing it so you can take it to go as you get back to work. If you fail to prepare, prepare to fail. There is nothing that sets you back quite as bad as a bad day of eating. Nutrition is 60% to our workouts’ 40%. You can’t out-workout a bad diet, and a couple missed or poor-quality meals creates a bad diet.

Once you have all of this down, you need to remind yourself that this is a process. You will not be at your end-goal next week. So find a plan that you are comfortable with, and complete it. Don’t get through, one, two, three weeks and then quit. That will start a vicious cycle. That’s why it’s important to believe in the program you are about to start. If you trust it, stick with it. If you don’t trust it, don’t start it and find a new one that you do and that you will stick with.

Finally, track your progress. Complete measurements and weigh-ins along the way. You can even take weekly pictures. You may not be able to see the transformation on a day-by-day basis, but the numbers won’t lie.

The most important thing you can do.. Get started and stay dedicated! You are starting for a reason. You have a goal in mind. Get to that goal. It’ll take hard work, but you can achieve anything. I’ve seen incredible transformations throughout my career. Yours can be next!

 

Until next time,

Josh

How Important is your Music to your Workout? You May be Surprised by the Answer.

How Important is your Music to your Workout? You May be Surprised by the Answer.

music blog picture

How many times have you pulled up to the gym, reached to your passenger seat, and realized that your headphones weren’t there. They are still sitting at home on your night stand. Do you turn around and get them? I won’t lie, I’ve gone back for them. It’s not that I hate working out and I need a distraction, but I knew that they helped me take my workouts to the next level. Even while I did this, I didn’t realize the science behind it that actually made my case even stronger.

There are many benefits to listening to music while you workout. For starters, and to cover the most obvious first, music is a distraction to the work you are doing. It produces a lower perceived effort for the workout you are putting yourself through. The music drowns out that little voice in the back of your head telling you to stop and telling you it’s too hard. As we get more tired, we turn the volume up because that voice gets louder. But it doesn’t stop there. University conducted research concluded that music boosts your endurance by 15%. 15%!!! It does this by improving your “feeling states” while working out. It helps us derive more pleasure from what we are doing. By doing this, it creates an atmosphere for us that allows us to workout to near exhaustion VOLUNTARILY!

The man conducting this research, Dr. Costas Karageorghis, had this to say: “The synchronous application of music resulted in much higher endurance while the motivational qualities of the music impacted significantly on the interpretation of fatigue symptoms right up to the point of voluntary exhaustion.” Meaning- music has a “magical” effect on us as we exercise and lets us go much farther than we could if we did not use it.

However, all music is not created equal. The research further shows that the optimum music for working out is between 120 and 140 beats per minute. This is faster paced, but not too fast. It’s a pace-setter for us as we go. It’s what keeps us moving. We synchronize our bodies to the music to create the ultimate workout experience.

Not buying it? Put it to the test. Workout with and without your headphones. Which workout went better? How hard did you push yourself in each? Give us a shout and let us know!

 

Top 5 Mistakes Made in Workout Programs- Make Sure this isn’t You!

Top 5 Mistakes Made in Workout Programs- Make Sure this isn’t You!

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I’ll be the first to admit I’ve made a couple of these myself, so don’t take this personal. We’re here to keep you honest and help get the most out of your routine! Some of these hold more weight than others, but the bottom line is that fixing all of these issues will help you get the most out of each and every workout. So here we go!

MISTAKE #1: NO WARMUP

Not going through a warm-up prior to resistance training. Now I don’t mean a set of 20 pushups or 20 reps with 135lbs before chest day. Yes, that’s important too, but most of us are already on top of that part. I mean a cardio warmup. This should be no more than 5 minutes, and personally, I go in the 3-5 minute range. Keep it short and sweet. This is meant to begin raising your heart rate and increase blood flow. It shouldn’t be a sprint, a power walk will do just fine. The purpose isn’t to become tired, it is simply to get your body prepared for exercise. There are also plenty of direct benefits that will make you feel less like this is a waste of time. For example, during this warmup, your blood vessels begin to dilate. This allows increased blood flow which leads to that awesome pump we all crave each workout. A warmup also increases the secretion of hormones. The additional hormones are automatically secreted to provide your body with energy for the work it realizes it is about to perform. More hormones pumping=more productive workout!

MISTAKE #2: TOO MUCH CARDIO BEFORE WEIGHTS

Some of you may already be used to doing cardio before your workout, but perhaps a little too much. I’ve heard the logic time and time again.. “I do cardio before weights because I know I won’t do it after. I’ll end up just going home.” This is actually extremely common and I’ve had countless clients who I’ve had to correct this strategy for. As I said before, keep this cardio down to five minutes or less. Any more than that and you could be negatively affecting your workout. For starters, doing cardio first requires work. Work requires energy. By using this energy before you weight train, you are decreasing your strength and affecting the amount of force you can produce while resistance training. This leads to overall lower intensity and much slower results. Next, by doing cardio first, you are tiring your core. A tired core is a weak core. Our base starts with our core, and if it is weakened, it makes us more susceptible to injury.

As an added bonus of doing cardio after your workout as opposed to before, you will actually burn more fat. To cut down fat, we need to burn our fat stores. But to do this, we must first burn off our glycogen stores to get to the fat. Weight training typically uses glycogen stores for energy, which means that we will have much less glycogen to burn off during our cardio before we get to that golden spot in fat storage. So- there’s a little bit of the science behind program design strategy to burn more fat!

MISTAKE #3: TOO MANY MACHINES

Every gym has a giant section of shiny new machines. This section is pretty appealing to the new guys at the gym. They look cool, they are easy to use, and they make working out more comfortable. You even get to sit down while you go through the exercise! Well that’s the first issue.. You want to engage your core in as many exercises as possible during your workout. Doing any exercise in a seated or supported environment removes that element immediately. Not to mention, machines don’t place as much stress on your muscles as free weights do. Free weights allow for proper movement patterns during compound exercises. It is near impossible for me to call any machine exercise a compound exercise. Some arguments can be made but the bottom line is that they just aren’t as effective. I’m not saying machines don’t have any place in your routine. I love finishing some workouts on machines. They can be great for isolation movements, so I like to use them to get a killer finishing pump. The point- build your routine around free weights, not machines.

MISTAKE #4: DOING THE SAME WORKOUT

If I had a dollar for every person I’ve seen doing the same workout at the same time on the same days, I’d be a rich man. Half the time, I don’t even need to see their workout to know it hasn’t changed. Do you know why? Because they look the same. Don’t fall into the trap of making your routine, ROUTINE. A workout can be great the first time, second time, maybe even a third time if you’re lucky. But your body is smart. It gets used to doing the same thing. It adapts to the workout. Why do we get stuck in this common error? There are plenty of reasons- It may have worked for you in the past, so you turn to it again. You may have seen someone else doing it who is in incredible shape. And here is what may be the most common answer- you don’t know what else to do! You may have had a free training session with a trainer and then decided to just repeat that workout. I know plenty of instances where this was the case. There are plenty of places to turn if you need help designing your routine. Personal training may be one way to go. Online training is another, more cost-effective option. (We happen to offer both of these at www.sd-evolution.com) 😉 If not those, you can find broader, more general workouts that may not be designed specifically for your body, but are still different and could be worth a shot.

MISTAKE #5: YOU CAN’T OUT-WOROUT A BAD DIET

This mistake isn’t a part of your workout program, but is still a major part of your fitness journey. I’m going to include it because your workout program will be useless if you aren’t controlling what you eat. I’ve had many clients come to me with minimal results initially because they thought that just by increasing their workouts, they could continue eating the way they had been. But working out alone isn’t enough. I argue that your diet is more important than your workout. Don’t get me wrong, they are both vital to good health and seeing results, but your diet will control exactly how your body changes. Whether you are going for weight loss or muscle gain, your nutrition needs to be on point to achieve your goals.

Going Against the Grain- Why You Shouldn’t Be Afraid to Try New Things at the Gym, Even if “so-called” Experts Say it’s a No No

Going Against the Grain- Why You Shouldn’t Be Afraid to Try New Things at the Gym, Even if “so-called” Experts Say it’s a No No

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In one breath we hear a set of rules, and in the next breath we hear that every body responds differently. “Complete high-rep circuits for weight loss. Lift heavy to get big.” Well what if I told you that you could complete high-rep workouts and get big, and lift heavy to lose weight. Would you believe me? Well, both of those are true. Yes, high-rep circuits can be useful for weight loss. And lifting heavy can help you gain mass. But they also work vice versa. How can that be? How can they work both ways?

For starters, program design has a lot to do with how you want to use a certain workout for a certain goal. If you walk up to a pretty new lifter in the gym who was looking to get big and told him that you were going to get him huge using sets of 15-20 reps, he would most likely shake his head and walk away. It is pounded in our heads from day one that rep ranges 3-5 are for strength, around 6-12 for hypertrophy, and anything higher than that is for endurance and weight loss only. This simply isn’t the case. The overriding factor here is volume. If you can create a workout of 15-20 reps per set that creates a higher volume workload, then you will be training for size. And if you do put yourself through this, you will experience one hell of a pump, especially if you’ve never incorporated anything like this before.

And what about lifting heavy for weight loss? Again, we are looking at program design here to differentiate between doing this for added strength and size, and weight loss. When looking for weight loss, we are looking to use heavy, total-body compound movements. The fact of the matter is that moving the heaviest weight possible requires a tremendous amount of work. What do we use to make our bodies do this work? Energy. Energy=calories. We burn the most calories while moving the most weight. A program alteration I would use to avoid lifting for size would be to keep everything in the “total body” category. Avoid overloading one specific muscle group with a lot of volume. However, just because you are lifting heavy doesn’t mean that you are going to gain size anyway; even if you do overload a muscle group. So don’t be too cautious worrying about that. You need to eat for size. If you are on a cutting diet while lifting heavy, you won’t be adding pounds. In fact, this will actually help you retain your muscle and strength while losing fat, which will further help you burn more calories and look amazing!

So what’s the other part of this? I mentioned earlier that every body responds differently. I don’t mean everybody. I mean every BODY. People can do the exact same routine, eat the exact same thing, and have exact OPPOSITE results. One of my biggest pet-peeves is seeing an article guaranteeing new-found success toward this one goal by using this new workout method. You can’t guarantee that. These “cookie-cutter” programs are bogus. The truth is, until someone knows exactly what you’ve done in the past and exactly how your body has changed from it, they can’t tell you how your body will change with this program. Some people put on muscle very easily. Some lose weight very fast. And some genetic freaks get the best of both worlds. But the majority of us don’t. You need to try new things to see how YOUR body adapts to them.

That is why I stress constantly trying new things. That is something I have been working on. The past 6 months, I have spent time in the gym and in research, coming up with new ways to push my body. Some methods have been effective, while others have yielded minimal results. But they were BOTH positives in my regimen. They both showed me what my body responds well to and what my body has no response to. So in designing future programs, I already know what works best for certain effects on my body. Some of these are things that I would have scoffed at two years ago, but some of them have worked.

If you are too ignorant, like I was, to try something new simply because it goes against what people say, then you are limiting your potential. You will never know what can truly take your body to the next level until you try a major variety of methods. Only then will you know what works best for you. If it works, great. If it doesn’t work, that’s great too. Honestly.. Don’t consider it a couple wasted weeks. You are now two weeks closer to your perfect program, and one step closer to YOUR perfect body.

 

Until next time,

Josh